Asian

Asian Slaw with Grilled Chicken Sate

Ohhhhhhh man, you have NO idea how excited I am about summer!  I LOVE summer, like really love summer.  I love summer weather, summer hours (its light out until after 9 p.m. right now, people!!), and most of all, summer food.  Mmmmm, summer food!  There’s fresh veggies in the garden (we’ve got quite a few things going right now, I’ll have to post about that sometime to show you our funny garden), fresh fruit, lots of grilling, eating outside, and homemade ice cream is finally appropriate.  YUM!

At this rate, we are going to have to invest in a new case of propane tanks for our little Weber Q because we are grilling so much (and guess what, that actually makes me excited!).  We broke out the grill recently in an attempt to eat something healthy for dinner that was full of flavor and could come together quickly.  As far as the grilling went, honestly, I cubed chicken, threw it on skewers and rubbed it with this sate seasoning.  Easy enough, right?  Right.  Moving on…

Now for the real star of this show, the Asian Slaw.  Oh, boy.  This was one of the first things I pinned on Pinterest when I joined back in the fall and just now got around to making it.  Now I’m kind of sad that I waited for so long.  This is so delicious and so fresh tasting – I just kept picking at it because it was so good that I couldn’t get enough.  There’s complex flavors from the dressing  (that is like liquid gold, I could probably drink the stuff) and various textures from the veggies, beans, and peanuts.  I’m not kidding, this is like a confetti party for your plate!  Its makes a ton (which I was skeptical about and considered cutting the recipe in half), but Branden and I ate it all within a day or two.  I mean, at least its not horribly unhealthy – I guess there’s worse things that we could be gorging ourselves in, right?!?  Right.

This would make some seriously delicious cookout food for a crowd, too – different from your typical broccoli slaw (which don’t get me wrong, I kind of like that stuff – raw ramen noodles in all.  I really hope that other people know what this is other wise you’re going to think that I’m gross).

Okay, enough rambling…make some slaw!

P.S.  Here’s the link to the recipe from Once Upon a Chef – the picture is MUCH better than mine.  Clearly I got too excited to eat this and didn’t pay attention to the fact that the picture doesn’t do the salad justice.  Whoops!

Dressing

  • 1/4 c. honey
  • 1/4 c. vegetable oil
  • 1/4 c. unseasoned rice vinegar
  • 1 TBS soy sauce
  • 1 tsp. Asian sesame oil
  • 1 TBS peanut butter
  • 1/2 tsp. salt
  • 1/2 tsp. Sriracha sauce
  • 1 TBS minced fresh ginger
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced

For the Slaw

  • 4 c.prepared shredded coleslaw
  • 2 c. prepared shredded carrots
  • 1 red bell pepper, thinly sliced into bite-sized pieces
  • 1 c. cooked and shelled edamame
  • 2 medium scallions, finely sliced
  • 1/2 c.chopped salted peanuts (or you can leave them whole)
  • 1/2 c. loosely packed chopped fresh cilantro
Make the dressing by combining all of the ingredients in a medium bowl.  Stir until the peanut butter is dissolved. Set aside.
Combine all of the slaw ingredients in a large bowl.  Add the dressing and toss well.  Let sit at least ten minutes so vegetables have a chance to soak up the dressing.  Taste and adjust seasoning if necessary (I added more Sriracha).  Serve cold.

Advertisements
Categories: Asian, Recipes, Salads | Tags: , , , , , , | 1 Comment

Beef & Broccoli Stir Fry

 

I just realized that my queue of posts ran out on Friday and I missed my Monday post.  Whoops.  I promise I have a full queue of yummy things from Pork Butt Chile Verde to Lightened Up Spinach and Artichoke dip (and the best blueberry pancakes ever and homemade marshmallows and an interesting pizza and…more!).  Until then, enjoy this super short but delicious post!

This is a super easy, fast weeknight meal that packed TONS of flavor and hit the nail of my Chinese craving right on the head.

Enjoy!

  • 2 (3 1/2-ounce) bags boil-in-bag long-grain white rice
  • 2 TBS dry sherry, divided
  • 2 TBS lower-sodium soy sauce, divided
  • 1 tsp. sugar
  • 1 lb. boneless sirloin steak, cut diagonally across grain into thin slices
  • 1/2 c. lower-sodium beef broth
  • 1 TBS cornstarch
  • 1 TBS hoisin sauce
  • 1 tsp. Sriracha (hot chile sauce) or 1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper
  • 2 TBS canola oil, divided
  • 1 TBS bottled ground fresh ginger
  • 2 tsp. minced garlic
  • 4 c. broccoli florets, chopped
  • 1/4 c. water
  • 1/3 c. sliced green onions

Cook rice according to directions.

While rice cooks, combine 1 tablespoon sherry, 1 tablespoon soy sauce, sugar, and beef. Stir together 1 tablespoon sherry, 1 tablespoon soy sauce, broth, cornstarch, hoisin, and Sriracha.

Heat 1 tablespoon oil in a large skillet over medium-high heat. Add beef mixture; sauté 3 minutes or until browned. Remove beef from pan. Add remaining 1 tablespoon oil to pan. Add ginger and garlic; cook 30 seconds, stirring constantly. Add broccoli and 1/4 cup water; cook 1 minute. Add onions; cook 1 minute, stirring constantly. Add broth mixture and beef mixture; cook 2 minutes or until beef is thoroughly heated and sauce is slightly thick. Serve beef mixture over rice.

Cooking Light

Categories: Asian, Chinese, Entrees, Recipes | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

Shrimp Pad Thai

Confession: A lot of times I sit down to write some posts and have COMPLETE writer’s block  Like, for real writer’s block.  Today’s one of those days.  Its not that this dish wasn’t delicious – I just can’t find anything witty or insightful to say with it.  So all you get is a really good recipe for Pad Thai and a picture to drool over.  That is all.  Hopefully my brain comes back to consciousness for the next post…

Enjoy!

  • 8 ounces uncooked flat rice noodles (pad Thai noodles)
  • 2 tablespoons dark brown sugar
  • 2 tablespoons lower-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons fish sauce
  • 1 1/2 tablespoons fresh lime juice
  • 1 tablespoon Sriracha or chili garlic sauce
  • 3 tablespoons canola oil
  • 1 cup (2-inch) green onion pieces
  • 8 ounces peeled and deveined large shrimp
  • 5 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1 cup fresh bean sprouts
  • 1/2 c. shoe-stringed carrots
  • 1/4 cup chopped unsalted dry-roasted peanuts
  • 3 tablespoons thinly sliced fresh basil

Cook noodles according to package directions; drain.

While water comes to a boil, combine sugar and next 4 ingredients (through Sriracha) in a small bowl.

Heat a large skillet or wok over medium-high heat. Add oil to pan; swirl to coat. Add onion pieces, shrimp, and garlic; stir-fry 2 minutes or until shrimp is almost done. Add cooked noodles; toss to combine. Stir in sauce; cook 1 minute, stirring constantly to combine. Arrange about 1 cup noodle mixture on each of 4 plates; top each serving with 1/4 cup bean sprouts, 1 tablespoon peanuts, and 2 teaspoons basil.

Adapted slightly from Cooking Light

Categories: Asian, Entrees, Pasta, Recipes, Thai | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

Spicy Coconut Shrimp Soup

This was a really yummy soup that I made the other day when it was kind of rainy and chilly outside.  Yes, chilly.  I’m rather upset about it actually, especially since everyone was talking about how it felt like fall.  But I’m not ready for fall!!  I feel like summer just started since it rained and was kind of cold the entire month of May (which was an improvement from April’s definite cold and rain).   While I love fall, I think that mid-August is the most depressing time of the year because I know up here in Ohio, September will be here before we know it,  bringing with it beautiful weather and then October comes even faster and we often see snow.  Ugh, snow.  I really do hate winter (mostly because I won’t see the sun consistently again until June)…sorry, I just had to get that off my chest!  I feel much better now…

So on to the recipe.  This was a delicious soup that is reminiscent of one of my favorite Thai dishes, Red Coconut Curry with Veggies.  YUM!  All the flavors of my my favorite dish were packed into this soup, but about half of the normal fat that comes with it.  If you’re looking for a little extra something, I would also suggest pouring the soup over some hot sticky rice before serving (I didn’t do this, but my mouth is kind of watering thinking about it right now).  To adjust the heat, use more or less curry paste.

Enjoy!

  • 3 1/2 c. chicken stock
  • 1 cup sliced mushrooms (I used wood mushrooms, but shitake would be good too)
  • 1 finely chopped red bell pepper
  • 1 TBS light brown sugar
  • 1 TBS fish sauce
  • 1 tsp grated, peeled fresh ginger
  • 1 TBS red curry paste
  • 1 cup coconut milk (remember my rule here, full fat is always the best!)
  • 1 lb. large shrimp, peeled and deveined
  • 1/2 c. thinly sliced green onions
  • 2 TBS thinly sliced fresh basil
  • 2 TBS fresh lime juice

Combine the first 7 ingredients (through curry paste) in a large saucepan over medium-high heat; bring to a boil.  Cover, reduce heat and simmer 10 minutes.  Stir in coconut milk, cook 2 minutes or until hot.  Add shrimp to pan; cook 3 minutes or until shrimp are done.  Remove pan from heat, stir in onions, basil, and juice.

Adapted from Cooking Light, March 2008

Categories: Asian, Entrees, Recipes, Soup, Thai | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

Green Curry with Bok Choy

I’ve never cooked with tofu before but was curious.  I’ve had it before at Asian restaurants and didn’t mind it so I thought I’d take a stab at it in this Thai dish…it saved me about 100 calories per serving versus chicken, so what did I have to loose?

As for the flavors of this dish?  Awesome.  I will definitely be making this sauce again.  The original recipe called for reduced fat coconut milk, but I know I’ve sworn up and down in other posts that I just can’t do it…I have to use full-fat coconut milk; its just not worth the flavor sacrifice to me (plus, it holds up better as its not near as runny when heated as reduced fat or fat free).  This sauce was simple and really delicious- I think I’m going to use this sauce as a base for my next attempt at recreating Branden and I’s favorite Coconut Chicken Curry from a hole-in-the-wall Middle-Eastern restaurant in Athens, Ohio that we love.  I have been working diligently to try to recreate it over the last year or so with some semi-success…I’ll let you know how this next attempt goes!

Now you’re probably wondering about my thoughts on tofu.  Interesting.  I think next time beside draining it, I may try pan frying it before adding it to the curry.  Reason being is because even though I used extra-firm tofu, I felt it started to fall apart the more I stirred the dish (and even more so as leftovers).  My thought with pan frying it would be that it would kind of form a crust around the pieces that would hold them together…my theory could be totally wrong here, but its worth a shot next time.  I also think this dish would be really yummy with chicken or shrimp as well (another “next time”).

Enjoy!

  • 1/2 c. chopped fresh cilantro
  • 2 TBS chopped, peeled fresh ginger
  • 2 tsp. ground coriander
  • 2 tsp. ground cumin
  • 8 garlic cloves, peeled
  • 2 small Serrano chiles, seeded (I couldn’t’ find Serrano (surprise, surprise) so I used 3 jalapenos instead)
  • 2 large shallots, coarsely chopped
  • 4 c. coarsely chopped broccoli florets (about 1 head)
  • 2 c. (1/2 inch thick) slices bok choy
  • 2 tsp. dark sesame oil
  • 4 tsp sugar
  • 1 TBS soy sauce
  • 3/4 tsp. kosher salt
  • 3 kaffir lime leaves (I found some that were dried, similar to bay leaves, since fresh are so hard to find around here.  Not quite the same, but they’re better than nothing.  Look for these at specialty Asian grocers)
  • 1 (13.5 oz.) can coconut milk
  • 1 (14 oz.) pkg water-packed, organic extra firm tofu, drained and cut into 3/4″ cubes
  • 1/4 c. fresh lime juice
  • 2 cups hot, cooked long-grain white rice (I used jasmine)
  • 1/4 c. chopped fresh basil
  • 2 TBS chopped fresh mint
  1. Combine first 7 ingredients in a food processor; process until smooth (may need to add 1/2 c. of water to make smooth).  Set aside
  2. Cook broccoli florets in boiling water in a large dutch oven for 3 minutes or until crisp tender.  Remove broccoli from water with a slotted spoon, drain, and rinse with cold water.  Drain and set aside.
  3. Heat Dutch oven over medium-high heat.  Add oil to pan, swirling to coat.  Add cilantro mixture to pan; saute 1 minute, stirring constantly.  Add sugar and next 4 ingredients (through coconut milk) to pan; bring to a boil.  Add tofu; cover, reduce heat, and simmer 6 minutes or until slightly thick.  Add broccoli, bok choy, and juice; cook 1 minutes or until heated; tossing to combine.  Discard lime leaves.  Serve over rice and sprinkle with basil and mint.

Adapted from Cooking Light, January 2011

Categories: Asian, Entrees, Recipes, Thai | Tags: , , , , , | 2 Comments

Soba Noodle Salad with Citrus Vinaigrette

I was desperate for a fresh tasting and healthy Asian dish the other night, so I was pretty pumped when I found this recipe.  It was so delicious that I ate more than I should have, but I couldn’t help it (not to mention I was starving).  My only word of caution with this recipe is the vinaigrette kind of absorbs into the noodles when saved.  While this was decent packed in my lunch the next day, I was kind of sad that the flavors had melded together.  My advice would be if you know you’re going to have leftovers, toss each serving individually in a portion of the vinaigrette only when ready to serve.  Other than that, this dish was really yummy and I have no complaints!

Enjoy!

  • 1 (8-ounce) pkg soba noodles (look for these in the Asian/Japanese section of the grocery store)
  • 1 1/4 c. frozen, shelled edamame
  • 3/4 c. matchstick-cut carrots
  • 1/3 c. sliced green onions
  • Small handful fresh, chopped cilantro
  • 1 1/2 tsp chopped serrano chile (I had to use a seeded jalapeno because my grocer didn’t have Serrano peppers, much to my dismay)
  • 1 lb. peeled and deveined medium shrimp (31-40 ct)
  • 1/4 tsp salt
  • 1/4 tsp black pepper
  • 2 TBS fresh orange juice
  • 2 TBS fresh lime juice
  • 1 TBS low-sodium soy sauce
  • 1 TBS dark sesame oil
  • 1 TBS olive oil
  1. Cook noodles in boiling water for 7 minutes or until almost al dente.  Add frozen edamame to pan; cook 1 minutes or until thoroughly heated.  Drain.  Place noodle mixture in a large bowl.  Add carrots, onions, cilantro, and chile; toss.
  2. Heat a large skillet over medium-high heat.  Sprinkle shrimp with salt and pepper.  Coat pan with cooking spray.  Add shrimp; cook 1 1/2 minutes on each side.  Add shrimp to noodle mixture.
  3. Combine orange juice and remaining ingredients in a bowl, stirring well with a whisk.  Drizzle juice mixture over noodle mixture; toss well.

Cooking Light December 2007

Categories: Asian, Entrees, Pasta, Recipes | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

Healthy Weeknight Dinner: Asian Beef and Bok Choy Salad

So today marked day number one of our cafeteria at work being closed for renovations which means I really need to step up my weeknight cooking so that I have leftovers to take for lunch seeing as I’m not going to walk across the street to McDonald’s everyday.  As tempting as it sounds, I probably shouldn’t go to the local Mexican joint everyday either so leftovers are definitely the winner.  Oh well…

Tonight’s dinner was a fresh, fast, and easy Asian-inspired salad that actually happens to be a Weight Watchers recipe.  This salad is really filling and there’s no oil in the dressing, so I don’t feel guilty piling my plate pretty high with the greens.  One of my favorite things about this salad are the greens of choice: Bok Choy and Napa Cabbage.  Bok Choy and Napa Cabbage are both incredibly crunchy and sturdy greens that are different from typical salad greens most folks tend to lean towards.  Their strength is put to the test when you toss the hot steak with it– most traditional salad greens would wilt, but the bok choy and napa cabbage stand up to the task.

So if you’re looking for a new twist on salad, go ahead and give this dish a try.  The citrus, soy sauce, and fish sauce flavors are awesome together and the little bit of red pepper gives a tiny kick of heat.  The combination of tender steak and crunchy greens is delicious and satisfies my need for varying textures in a meal.

I’ve made this salad several times and really don’t stray from the recipe because its quite good as written.  Don’t be intimidated by fish sauce, it doesn’t make the salad taste like fish!  It is made from fish oils, but its more of a salty condiment used in Asian cooking.  I promise, its not as disgusting as it sounds but I wouldn’t go around taking swigs of it.  Enjoy!

Asian Beef and Bok Choy Salad

  • 1 lb. beef sirloin, trimmed
  • 2 TBS fish sauce
  • 1 TBS reduced-sodium soy sauce
  • 2 tsp grated lime zest
  • 2 tsp sugar
  • 2 garlic cloves, minced
  • 1/3 c. lime juice
  • Pinch red pepper flakes
  • 4 c. thinly sliced Bok Choy
  • 4 c. thinly slicked Napa Cabbage
  • 2 shallots, thinly sliced
  1. Put beef on plate and place in freezer until very firm, about 30 minutes.  Place 1 TBS fish sauce, soy sauce, lime zest, 1 tsp of sugar, and 1 clove garlic in large zip-close plastic bag.  Thinly slice beff and add to bag; turn to coat beef.  Refrigerate, turning bag occasionally, 30 minutes.
  2. To make dressing, whisk together lime juice and remaining 1 TBS fish sauce, 1 tsp sugar, and 1 garlic clove in small bowl; stir in pepper flakes.  Combine Bok Choy, cabbage, and shallots in large serving bowl.
  3. Spray large deep nonstick skillet or wok with nonstick spray and set over medium-high heat until a drop of water sizzles on it.  Add steak and stir-fry until lightly browned, about 1 minute.  Add steak and reserved dressing to bok choy mixture; toss to coat.

And for those of you who care, here’s the nutrition facts:

Per serving (2 cups): 208 cal, 4 g fat, 1 g sat. fat, 0 g trans fat, 73 mg Chol, 961 mg sod., 9 g carb., 2 g fiber, 33 g protien, 163 mg calc

Categories: Asian, Entrees, Recipes, Salads | Tags: , , , , | 1 Comment

Blog at WordPress.com.